Posts tagged Bibliography
Bambi: A Life In The Woods by Felix Salten
Young Diane herself complained to her father that Bambi’s mother needn’t have died, and when Walt answered that he was only following the book, Diane protested that he had taken other liberties and that in any case he was Walt Disney and he could do anything he wanted.
— Neal Gabler in Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination
bambi book.jpg
The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper

An analogue for the Good Samaritan parable told in The Gospel of Luke chapter 10. So, is Casey Jr. saying "I think I can, I think I can...I thought I could, I thought I could" meant to prime your thoughts to that story, so you can recognize the Samaritan in Timothy and the crows later, or am I just overthinking it as usual?

Archie Comics

I'm not a big Archie fan myself, so this collection seems as good a place as any to start to me, but if you have a better suggestion please join the conversation.

I do know that the series was rebooted. Although, if you ever need to fake your way through a conversation about comics a good starting point is "well what did you think of the latest reboot?" So, knowing that there was a reboot doesn't mean much in itself, but the reason I know there was a reboot is because my current all time favoritest comic book writer, Ryan North, was writing on the rebooted Jughead for a little while. I haven't read them yet, but I cannot recommend highly enough Ryan's work on The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl. I could gush for days, as evidenced by the fact that I really didn't need to go down this tangent at all. Do yourself a favor and get started at the beginning.

Jughead Vol. 2
By Chip Zdarsky, Ryan North
Elmer Gantry by Sinclair Lewis
Elmer Gantry
By Sinclair Lewis

How one of Sinclair Lewis's short stories ended up at Disney, and in a film called Fun and Fancy Free, when Sinclair Lewis himself was none of the above, is a great mystery. If you have any information, please join the conversation.

Sinclair Lewis is best known for three novels: Main Street (1920), about stifling conformity in a Minnesota town, Babbit (1922), about a morally bankrupt business man, and Elmer Gantry (1927) the original crooked telemarketer. He was the first writer from the U.S. to win a Nobel Prize in literature.

Virginibus Puerisque by Robert Louis Stevenson
Virginibus Puerisque (annotated)
By Robert Louis Stevenson
Extreme busyness, whether at school or college, kirk or market, is a symptom of deficient vitality; and a faculty for idleness implies a catholic appetite and a strong sense of personal identity. There is a sort of dead-alive, hackneyed people about, who are scarcely conscious of living except in the exercise of some conventional occupation. Bring these fellows into the country, or set them aboard ship, and you will see how they pine for their desk or their study. They have no curiosity; they cannot give themselves over to random provocations; they do not take pleasure in the exercise of their faculties for its own sake; and unless Necessity lays about them with a stick, they will even stand still. It is no good speaking to such folk: they cannot be idle, their nature is not generous enough; and they pass those hours in a sort of coma, which are not dedicated to furious moiling in the gold-mill. When they do not require to go to the office, when they are not hungry and have no mind to drink, the whole breathing world is a blank to them. If they have to wait an hour or so for a train, they fall into a stupid trance with their eyes open. To see them, you would suppose there was nothing to look at and no one to speak with; you would imagine they were paralysed or alienated; and yet very possibly they are hard workers in their own way, and have good eyesight for a flaw in a deed or a turn of the market. They have been to school and college, but all the time they had their eye on the medal; they have gone about in the world and mixed with clever people, but all the time they were thinking of their own affairs. As if a man’s soul were not too small to begin with, they have dwarfed and narrowed theirs by a life of all work and no play; until here they are at forty, with a listless attention, a mind vacant of all material of amusement, and not one thought to rub against another, while they wait for the train. Before he was breeched, he might have clambered on the boxes; when he was twenty, he would have stared at the girls; but now the pipe is smoked out, the snuff-box empty, and my gentleman sits bolt upright upon a bench, with lamentable eyes. This does not appeal to me as being Success in Life.
— Robert Louis Stevenson (From Chapter 3: An Apology For Idlers)
Main Street by Sinclair Lewis
Main Street
By Sinclair Lewis

How one of Sinclair Lewis's short stories ended up at Disney, and in a film called Fun and Fancy Free, when Sinclair Lewis himself was none of the above, is a great mystery. If you have any information, please join the conversation.

Sinclair Lewis is best known for three novels: Main Street (1920), about stifling conformity in a Minnesota town, Babbit (1922), about a morally bankrupt business man, and Elmer Gantry (1927) the original crooked telemarketer. He was the first writer from the U.S. to win a Nobel Prize in literature.

 

Babbit by Lewis Sinclair
Babbitt
By Sinclair Lewis

How one of Sinclair Lewis's short stories ended up at Disney, and in a film called Fun and Fancy Free, when Sinclair Lewis himself was none of the above, is a great mystery. If you have any information, please join the conversation.

Sinclair Lewis is best known for three novels: Main Street (1920), about stifling conformity in a Minnesota town, Babbit (1922), about a morally bankrupt business man, and Elmer Gantry (1927) the original crooked telemarketer. He was the first writer from the U.S. to win a Nobel Prize in literature.

The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library by Carl Barks

Carl Barks is a legend in the history of Disney and of comic books. As Michial mentioned, he's particularly beloved in Northern Europe. For example, The Carl Barks Collection, is what looks to be a gorgeous academic set of his works, that was only published in Norway, Denmark, Germany, Finland, and Sweden. Too bad I only read English! 

Thankfully, if you are an English reader like me there is Fantagraphics. They are putting out the complete Donald Duck and Scrooge McDuck works that were written and illustrated by Barks - although they are not releasing them in chronological order, which is a little confusing. Also, no commentary as far as I can tell.

And, in great news for me, they are now being released through kindle and comixology, so mea-culpa. Last I checked that wasn't true, but I'm happy to be wrong on that one.

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Great Expectations
By Charles Dickens

Do characters like Jiminy Cricket and Timothy Mouse, the kind guides and advocates who help our hero along, have a history in literature - or are they an invention of Walt Disney's story team? Michial saw Dante, or perhaps Elizabethan fools. Victoria spotted some parallels with guardianship in Dickens.

A younger character both sheltered from the world and brought deeper into subcultury dark places by characters who are more familiar with the subcultury underworld place.
— Victoria Reynolds Farmer
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
David Copperfield
By Charles Dickens

Do characters like Jiminy Cricket and Timothy Mouse, the kind guides and advocates who help our hero along, have a history in literature - or are they an invention of Walt Disney's story team? Michial saw Dante, or perhaps Elizabethan fools. Victoria spotted some parallels with guardianship in Dickens.

A younger character both sheltered from the world and brought deeper into subcultury dark places by characters who are more familiar with the subcultury underworld place.
— Victoria Reynolds Farmer
Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens
Little Dorrit
By Charles Dickens

Do characters like Jiminy Cricket and Timothy Mouse, the kind guides and advocates who help our hero along, have a history in literature - or are they an invention of Walt Disney's story team? Michial saw Dante, or perhaps Elizabethan fools. Victoria spotted some parallels with guardianship in Dickens.

A younger character both sheltered from the world and brought deeper into subcultury dark places by characters who are more familiar with the subcultury underworld place.
— Victoria Reynolds Farmer
The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri

It took us four episodes, but I feel like we are finally a legitimate member of the Christian Humanist Network now that we have a Dante reference. And to think we could have had it back during Pinocchio if I'd only asked Michial the right question: do characters like Jiminy Cricket and Timothy Mouse, the kind guides and advocates who help our hero along, have a history in literature - or are they an invention of Walt Disney's story team? (You may recall that the use of Jiminy was how Disney cracked the story of Pinocchio. Pinocchio is so unsympathetic in the novel that translating the book to screen was a challenge. Jiminy then became the prototype of a kind of character that we see throughout the Disney canon - including Timothy Mouse.) Michial sees a lineage all the way back to Virgil in Dante.

The difference is Dante respects Virgil
— Michial Farmer
East of the Sun and West of the Moon by Kay Nielsen

Kay Nielsen did the artwork for the Ava Maria sequence in Fantasia, which is one of my favorite moments in the Disney Canon.

This finely crafted reprint restores the stunning detail and artistry of Nielsen’s images to their original splendor. Featuring 46 illustrations, including many enlarged details from Nielsen’s rare original watercolors, the book is printed in five colors with a lovingly designed slipcase. Three accompanying essays, illustrated with dozens of rare and previously unseen artworks by Nielsen, explore the history of Norwegian folktales, Nielsen’s life and work, and how this masterpiece came to be.